Archive for 2017

  • The Very Best Memory Exercise

    November 21st, 2017 | Memory | journalpulp | No Comments

    Among the faculties of the human mind, memory is the one we make most frequent use of, insofar as it’s incessant and perpetual. “Memory,” as Samuel Johnson said, “is the primary and fundamental power, without which there could be no other intellectual operation. Judgment and reasoning presuppose something already known, and they draw their decisions […]

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  • What Does It ACTUALLY Mean To Be Smart?

    November 19th, 2017 | Reading | journalpulp | 1 Comment

    This is a brand-new course I’m teaching — name your price if you pre-enroll. Name Your Price! Reading is a dying art. And yet even as it dies, even as more and more people stop reading in favor of scanning, skimming, reblogging, LIKING, and so forth, it’s never been more important to become a real […]

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  • How to Read 200 Books a Year

    November 13th, 2017 | Reading | journalpulp | No Comments

    This is a brand-new course I’m teaching — name your price if you pre-enroll. Name Your Price! Reading is a dying art. And yet even as it dies, even as more and more people stop reading in favor of scanning, skimming, reblogging, LIKING, and so forth, it’s never been more important to become a real […]

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  • A Taste of Venom

    November 10th, 2017 | Individualism | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    There is evidently something quite controversial in believing, as Thoreau did and as I do, that the government which governs least, governs best. It’s somehow regarded as deviant behavior, unpatriotic even. In 2008, not long after the release of Al Gore’s extraordinarily effective propaganda piece called An Inconvenient Truth — whose ten-year predictions have proven […]

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  • The Book of Dog: The Dance is Life

    October 20th, 2017 | Book of Dog | journalpulp | No Comments

    Death, where is thy sting? Dance me very tenderly, and dance me very long. Dance me to the end of love. Buy the beautiful paperback

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  • The Great Electrifier Takes on Climate Change

    October 14th, 2017 | Book of Dog, College of Subversive Knowledge | journalpulp | No Comments

    Climate change — or global warming, if you’re antiquated — is a dead duck. It always has been. The Great Electrifier explains why:

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  • The Woman Who Made a Pact with the Devil: Paperback and Kindle

    October 3rd, 2017 | Writers | journalpulp | 1 Comment

    Kindle download here. Buy the paperback here! She hadn’t expected to like him. And yet Abby Rainveil — a writer sent to interview the strange man everyone calls Kumulous — finds herself deeply drawn to his relaxed disposition, his erudition, the way he listens to her every word, his strength. Increasingly mesmerized by the charged […]

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  • The Woman Who Made a Pact With the Devil: Complete

    September 24th, 2017 | Writing | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    CHAPTER 1   She hadn’t expected to like him. He was too skeletal, for one thing, his eyes set a little too deeply inside his skull, his gaze a little too unabashed, too knowing. Longish black hair swept up off a high forehead, with sea-green eyes and a prominent brow-ridge, he reminded her of a […]

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  • 101 Things to do Instead of College

    September 20th, 2017 | Writing | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    _________   Kindle download here. Buy it here! The most successful people in life aren’t particularly gifted or talented. They become successful, rather, by wanting to be successful. Genetic giftedness is a figment. There are no such things as prodigies. Talent is a process. Intelligence is a process. Have you ever noticed that the smartest […]

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  • The Woman Who Made a Pact with the Devil (Chapters 1 – 36): The End

    September 15th, 2017 | Writing | journalpulp | No Comments

    CHAPTER 1   She hadn’t expected to like him. He was too skeletal, for one thing, his eyes set a little too deeply inside his skull, his gaze a little too unabashed, too knowing. Longish black hair swept up off a high forehead, with sea-green eyes and a prominent brow-ridge, he reminded her of a […]

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