Posts Tagged ‘conflict’

  • Top Five Reasons Your Novel Will Succeed

    Top Five Reasons Your Novel Will Succeed

    February 1st, 2013 | How to write a novel | journalpulp | No Comments

    Here, in no particular order: 5. Your storyline is compelling You’ve created a sequence of events that progresses logically and purposefully and that culminates in climax. This sequence is called plot. The plot of a short story can (and probably should) involve just one single incident or main conflict. And conflict is clash. A clash […]

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  • Conflicted

    October 22nd, 2012 | Conflict | journalpulp | No Comments

    The situation is the nucleus of your story: it contains the kernel of your conflict from which the rest of your storyline will grow — and a real storyline cannot exist without some sort of conflict. But what exactly is conflict? In writing circles, you hear the word incessantly, and yet you almost never hear […]

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  • What Plot Is And What Plot Is Not

    What Plot Is And What Plot Is Not

    March 14th, 2012 | Plot | journalpulp | 4 Comments

    Plot is not memoir. Plot is not diary. Plot is not journal. Plot is not history. Plot is not erotica. Plot is not dialogue. Plot is not essay. Plot is not philosophy. Plot is not chronicle. Plot is not action alone. Plot is something very specific: it is the method by which you present your […]

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  • How To Write A Novel: The Fast-And-Furious Version

    How To Write A Novel: The Fast-And-Furious Version

    March 7th, 2012 | How to write a novel | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    Here’s how you create a setting: One hour before nightfall, on a pink-and-blue evening in the third week of August, 2011 … Here’s how you create a character: a solitary man traveling on foot … Here’s how you introduce a situation: entered the small, tree-shadowed town of Salt — an isolated village about which many […]

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  • Plot and Theme: A Complicated Relationship

    Plot and Theme: A Complicated Relationship

    September 6th, 2011 | Plot, Storytelling, The Situation, Theme, Universality | journalpulp | No Comments

    The Situation is the nucleus of your story: it contains the kernel of your conflict from which the rest of your storyline will grow. A real story cannot exist without some sort of conflict. If you have a specific message that you wish to get across (e.g. the destructiveness of superstition), it is that message […]

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  • Climax: Bringing Together The Essential Components Of A Novel

    Climax: Bringing Together The Essential Components Of A Novel

    August 11th, 2011 | Characterization, Climax, Plot, Storytelling, Style | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    A good novel consists of four primary components, all of which interact in an almost symbiotic way. Those elements are plot, character, theme, and style. (The recapitulation of theme-and-plot combined is what I call The Situation.) Of those four components, the first three are primarily concerned with subject-matter, and the last — style, which is […]

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  • The Situation

    The Situation

    August 5th, 2011 | Plot, Storytelling, Suspense, The Situation | journalpulp | 7 Comments

    The best stories are those that can be summed up in one sentence. Which is to say, a solid story hinges upon its Situation. The Situation is not the whole story but the essence of that story’s conflict, which will in turn shape the events of your plot. Here is an example of a situation: […]

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  • Creating Suspense: Getting Readers To Eat Out The Palm Of Your Hand

    Creating Suspense: Getting Readers To Eat Out The Palm Of Your Hand

    July 18th, 2011 | Plot, Storytelling, Suspense | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    If you want to rivet readers, you must give readers something to worry about. Make the reader nervous. Make her feel intrigued. Make her curious. This issue, which is very closely associated with plot, is called suspense. Suspense is when your eyes are nailed to the screen. It’s when you’re coming out of your seat. […]

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