Posts Tagged ‘Cormac McCarthy’

  • Fifty Best Southern Novels Ever Written?

    Fifty Best Southern Novels Ever Written?

    April 4th, 2014 | Uncategorized | journalpulp | No Comments

    What do you think? Here’s how the writer begins: Sure, alphabetically, Absalom, Absalom! is first on this list. But, coincidentally, it is also the greatest Southern novel ever written. A crowing achievement of William Faulkner’s experimentation in narratives and storytelling, it encapsulates all that defines the post-war (that’s the Civil War, you guys) Southern mentality, […]

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  • Popular Fiction Versus Literary

    Popular Fiction Versus Literary

    August 7th, 2013 | Popular fiction versus literary fiction | journalpulp | 5 Comments

    The difference between popular fiction and literary fiction is subtle but unmistakable. The criteria is graded — think of it as a spectrum — so that a book or movie can have elements of both literary fiction and also elements of genre fiction at the same time. But there is undoubtedly a distinction. It is […]

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  • “Curiously Dull, Furiously Commonplace, Often Meaningless” (And Other Literary Virtues)

    October 10th, 2012 | Writers | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    “Rat-eyed” Virginia Woolf described Somerset Maugham as. “No man ever put more of his heart and soul into the written word,” said Eudora Welty of William Faulkner. “Curiously dull, furiously commonplace, and often meaningless,” Alfred Kazin said of William Faulkner. “Hemingway never climbed out on a limb and never used a word where the reader […]

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  • Top Ten Best Novels You’ve Never Heard Of

    Top Ten Best Novels You’ve Never Heard Of

    March 4th, 2012 | Best Novels | journalpulp | 77 Comments

    Or perhaps you have. Yet the following list, laid out in no particular order (with the exception of Number 1), is relatively obscure: Nothing is as it seems under the sharp western sun. After recovering from an enigmatic and near-fatal illness, Gasteneau, a man with an iron will, glimpses something so extraordinary and so horrific […]

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  • A Novel Shouldn’t Make You Think, It Should Make You Shiver

    A Novel Shouldn’t Make You Think, It Should Make You Shiver

    February 27th, 2012 | philosophy of art | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    In a lecture he delivered at Cornell University, Vladimir Nabokov said this: “A work of art shouldn’t make you think, it should make you shiver.” And yet in reply to that one must ask: what about those of us who actually like for a book to make us think? What about those of us who […]

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  • Top Thirteen Best First Sentences In Literature

    Top Thirteen Best First Sentences In Literature

    January 18th, 2012 | Beginnings | journalpulp | 11 Comments

    Here Are My Top Thirteen Best First Sentences in Literature:     13. It was a wrong number that started it, the telephone ringing three times in the dead of night, and the voice on the other end asking for someone he was not. (Paul Auster, City of Glass) 12. A few miles south of Soledad, […]

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  • How To Begin Your Story

    How To Begin Your Story

    August 17th, 2011 | Beginnings, Characterization, Plot | journalpulp | 3 Comments

    Establish your setting early on. Give us The When, The Where, The Weather — the overall tone. Is your story happy, soft, somber? John Steinbeck does this so well in the beautiful opening of Of Mice and Men: A few miles south of Soledad, the Salinas River drops in close to the hillside bank and […]

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  • Writers On Writers

    Writers On Writers

    August 14th, 2011 | Literature, Writers | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    “Rat-eyed” Virginia Woolf described Somerset Maugham as. “No man ever put more of his heart and soul into the written word,” said Eudora Welty of William Faulkner. “Curiously dull, furiously commonplace, and often meaningless,” Alfred Kazin said of William Faulkner. “Hemingway never climbed out on a limb and never used a word where the reader […]

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