Posts Tagged ‘Marcel Proust’

  • “Curiously Dull, Furiously Commonplace, Often Meaningless” (And Other Literary Virtues)

    October 10th, 2012 | Writers | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    “Rat-eyed” Virginia Woolf described Somerset Maugham as. “No man ever put more of his heart and soul into the written word,” said Eudora Welty of William Faulkner. “Curiously dull, furiously commonplace, and often meaningless,” Alfred Kazin said of William Faulkner. “Hemingway never climbed out on a limb and never used a word where the reader […]

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  • The Curious Lives — And Deaths — Of Writers And Artists

    The Curious Lives — And Deaths — Of Writers And Artists

    February 24th, 2012 | Writers | journalpulp | 6 Comments

    Under threat of arrest during the Reign of Terror, the French writer¬†Nicolas Chamfort (1741 — 1794) shot himself in the head and slit his own throat. Then died of pneumonia while recovering in his bed. Whereas Lavoisier was guillotined in the Reign of Terror. “A good book is twice as good if it’s short.” Said […]

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  • Writers On Writers

    Writers On Writers

    August 14th, 2011 | Literature, Writers | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    “Rat-eyed” Virginia Woolf described Somerset Maugham as. “No man ever put more of his heart and soul into the written word,” said Eudora Welty of William Faulkner. “Curiously dull, furiously commonplace, and often meaningless,” Alfred Kazin said of William Faulkner. “Hemingway never climbed out on a limb and never used a word where the reader […]

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