Posts Tagged ‘T.S. Eliot’

  • Literary Pulp

    February 13th, 2015 | Writers | journalpulp | 4 Comments

    Truman Streckfus Persons was Truman Capote’s real name. The title Finnegans Wake contains no apostrophe in the word Finnegans. Thus Finnegans is a plural and Wake is a verb. Issac Newtons’s father was illiterate. Walt Whitman’s mother was illiterate. Roald Dahl was an anti-semite. Djuna Barnes had no formal education at all. Edmund Wilson once […]

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  • “Curiously Dull, Furiously Commonplace, Often Meaningless” (And Other Literary Virtues)

    October 10th, 2012 | Writers | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    “Rat-eyed” Virginia Woolf described Somerset Maugham as. “No man ever put more of his heart and soul into the written word,” said Eudora Welty of William Faulkner. “Curiously dull, furiously commonplace, and often meaningless,” Alfred Kazin said of William Faulkner. “Hemingway never climbed out on a limb and never used a word where the reader […]

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  • Artists And Musicians

    Artists And Musicians

    February 23rd, 2012 | Artists and Musicians | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    Saphho was small and dark, yet in his famous rendering of her, Raphael made her blond and fleshy. Richard Wagner — who wore pink underwear — was about five feet tall. Gauguin fathered at least four illegitimate children in Tahiti. This in addition to the legitimate clan he abandoned back home. Beethoven, Brahms, Gluck, Haydn, […]

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  • Writers On Writers

    Writers On Writers

    August 14th, 2011 | Literature, Writers | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    “Rat-eyed” Virginia Woolf described Somerset Maugham as. “No man ever put more of his heart and soul into the written word,” said Eudora Welty of William Faulkner. “Curiously dull, furiously commonplace, and often meaningless,” Alfred Kazin said of William Faulkner. “Hemingway never climbed out on a limb and never used a word where the reader […]

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  • Writers Discussing Other Writers

    August 8th, 2011 | Literary trivia, Quotes | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    Charles Baudelaire spent two hours a day getting dressed. When Edgar Allen Poe married his cousin Virginia, he was twenty-seven, and she was thirteen. And consumptive. The genius poet-priest Gerard Manley Hopkins wanted to change his name to Pook Tunks. Robert Frost had only five poems accepted in his first seventeen years of writing and […]

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  • Lice In The Locks Of Literature (And Other Curious Quotations)

    Lice In The Locks Of Literature (And Other Curious Quotations)

    July 16th, 2011 | Literature, Quotes | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    The fact is, I did not eat every day during that period of my life. Said the surrealist Andre Breton, explaining the possible provenance of some of his strange and early literature. They rowed her in across the rolling foam — The cruel, crawling foam — to her grave beside the sea. Wrote the English […]

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