Posts Tagged ‘Truman Capote’

  • Literary Pulp

    February 13th, 2015 | Writers | journalpulp | 4 Comments

    Truman Streckfus Persons was Truman Capote’s real name. The title Finnegans Wake contains no apostrophe in the word Finnegans. Thus Finnegans is a plural and Wake is a verb. Issac Newtons’s father was illiterate. Walt Whitman’s mother was illiterate. Roald Dahl was an anti-semite. Djuna Barnes had no formal education at all. Edmund Wilson once […]

    Read More

  • Creative Writing Courses are a “Waste of Time”

    Creative Writing Courses are a “Waste of Time”

    March 17th, 2014 | Writing | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    The novelist Hanif Kureishi — who teaches creative writing at Kingston University, and whom I’d frankly never heard of before I saw this article — has recently come under some fire for remarks he made to The Guardian newspaper: “A lot of my students just can’t tell a story. They can write sentences but they […]

    Read More

  • Want To Be A Writer? Drop Out of College

    Want To Be A Writer? Drop Out of College

    June 20th, 2013 | Writing Talent | journalpulp | 4 Comments

    In an interview Truman Capote once gave, he said the following about becoming a writer: “The last thing in the world I would do was waste my time going to college, because I knew what I wanted to do. The only reason to go to college is if you want to be a doctor, a […]

    Read More

  • “Curiously Dull, Furiously Commonplace, Often Meaningless” (And Other Literary Virtues)

    October 10th, 2012 | Writers | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    “Rat-eyed” Virginia Woolf described Somerset Maugham as. “No man ever put more of his heart and soul into the written word,” said Eudora Welty of William Faulkner. “Curiously dull, furiously commonplace, and often meaningless,” Alfred Kazin said of William Faulkner. “Hemingway never climbed out on a limb and never used a word where the reader […]

    Read More

  • The Individualistic, The Eccentric, The Cool, The Anachronistic

    September 30th, 2012 | Writers | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    Jean Jacques Rousseau, who categorically believed in the existence of vampires. Persistent legend that the young Leonardo De Vinci was so strong he could — and frequently did — straighten horseshoes with his bare hands. Charles Dickens, a hyper-manic walker who sometimes went twenty-five miles at a headlong pace. A walk? What on earth for? […]

    Read More

  • Top Ten Best Novels You’ve Never Heard Of

    Top Ten Best Novels You’ve Never Heard Of

    March 4th, 2012 | Best Novels | journalpulp | 77 Comments

    Or perhaps you have. Yet the following list, laid out in no particular order (with the exception of Number 1), is relatively obscure: Nothing is as it seems under the sharp western sun. After recovering from an enigmatic and near-fatal illness, Gasteneau, a man with an iron will, glimpses something so extraordinary and so horrific […]

    Read More

  • Writers On Writers

    Writers On Writers

    August 14th, 2011 | Literature, Writers | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    “Rat-eyed” Virginia Woolf described Somerset Maugham as. “No man ever put more of his heart and soul into the written word,” said Eudora Welty of William Faulkner. “Curiously dull, furiously commonplace, and often meaningless,” Alfred Kazin said of William Faulkner. “Hemingway never climbed out on a limb and never used a word where the reader […]

    Read More