Recent Posts

  • Oscar Wilde: Anniversary of His Death & the Wildest Misconceptions about Oscar

    November 19th, 2019 | Oscar Wilde | journalpulp | No Comments

    Oscar Wilde, the last of the great and hopelessly flamboyant, whose full name was Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde, is, perhaps because of his flamboyance and his fame — a fame which ended in scandal and tragedy — frequently misrepresented and misconceived. He died 119 years ago this month. I offer here three of the […]

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  • Petrarch, Shakespeare, and Sonnet 73

    November 15th, 2019 | Shakespeare | journalpulp | No Comments

    The Italian poet Petrarch (1304-1374) did not invent the Petrarchan sonnet. It was perhaps first used by Dante (1265-1321) and then later by many of Dante’s contemporaries and imitators. But Petrarch’s excellence with the form — especially when celebrating his beloved Laura — made the form much more widely known, so that even into the […]

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  • William Shakespeare and Sonnet 35

    November 4th, 2019 | Uncategorized | journalpulp | 5 Comments

    It is a singularly significant fact about Shakespeare’s sonnets that they consistently outsell everything else he wrote. The plays — performed with metronomic-regularity year in year out — are far more frequently taught than the sonnets. But Shakespeare’s sonnets are more widely bought and read. Among the readers of Shakespeare’s sonnets, you will find any […]

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  • Early Winter

    October 28th, 2019 | Poetry | journalpulp | 3 Comments

    The crystal blades of winter frost Have snipped the leaves that dot the field. The trees leak iron-black across The sky where evening swallows wheeled. A knifey light cuts deep and shows Leaves with their intricate designs Half sodden in the drifted snows, Beneath the moaning, deathless pines. And wind like water softly pours Over […]

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  • Two Poems

    Two Poems

    October 19th, 2019 | Uncategorized | journalpulp | 3 Comments

    I You came to me in a dream last night.Ghostly and dark, you were dressed in flowing white.Your hair hung long. Your eyes were light. You stood nearand spoke in a whisper that I could not hear.Together we walked through the desolate roomsof a strange house, where faint perfumesspiked the air. Outside, the wind blew […]

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  • Highway 66

    Highway 66

    October 12th, 2019 | Uncategorized | journalpulp | 1 Comment

    Thin blue highway hugging the soft edge of night, along this strange western town burningwith tangerine lightlike a necklace laid across a swellof grass, over some vast New Mexican plain,it fills me with a yearningI’ve never quite been able to quell,or explain.

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  • Neck Between Two Heads: a story of civilization and superstition

    Neck Between Two Heads: a story of civilization and superstition

    November 5th, 2018 | Fiction | journalpulp | 74 Comments

    CHAPTER 1 This happened shortly after his mother died, when he was seventeen-years-old, and the real violence had not yet begun. The day after her death, he dropped out of high school and went to live with his half brother, whom he’d only met once, eight years before. His half brother’s name was Jon. He […]

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  • Quiddity

    Quiddity

    September 6th, 2018 | Bartending | journalpulp | No Comments

    This certainly beats most of the other stuff I’ve had sent to me lately. Thank you TRD! And thank you Merrriam-Webster for using my sentence. “Quiddity” — Word of the Day, September 6th, 2018. That article, incidentally, which discusses the difference between mezcal and tequila, was part of a monthly series I once wrote for […]

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  • How to Write a Story

    May 29th, 2017 | How to write a novel | journalpulp | No Comments

    Here’s how you create a setting: One hour before nightfall, on a pink-and-blue evening in the third week of August, 2011 … Here’s how you create a character: a solitary man traveling on foot … Here’s how you introduce a situation: entered the small, tree-shadowed town of Clifton — an isolated village about which many […]

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  • Beware the Ides of March

    March 15th, 2017 | Shakespeare | journalpulp | No Comments

    Ceasar: The ides of March are come. Soothsayer: Ay, Caesar, but not gone. — Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene 1. The word ides is derived from the ancient Roman calendar and comes from the Latin idus, which, as Oxford explains it, means “a day falling roughly in the middle of each month (the 15th day […]

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