Recent Posts

  • It’s Not How Good You ARE: It’s How Good You WANT To Be

    January 16th, 2020 | Talent | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    The most successful people in life aren’t particularly gifted or talented. They become successful, rather, by wanting to be successful. Genetic giftedness is a figment. There are really no such things as prodigies. Talent is a process. Have you ever observed that the smartest kids in school are almost never the ones who go on […]

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  • Basketball Jones

    January 9th, 2020 | Basketball | journalpulp | 9 Comments

    I need someone to set a pick for me at the free-throw line of life.

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  • All The Sand In All The Sea

    January 7th, 2020 | Bartending | journalpulp | 17 Comments

    I recently discovered this song — on an obscure FM radio-station — and I fell in love with it. So I decided to make a bartending video to go along with it.

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  • On Light, Darkness, December — And Fighting For Your Ideas

    December 25th, 2019 | Christmas | journalpulp | No Comments

    Relentlessly Optimistic  Her parents had never meant to mistreat her. On the contrary, they’d always meant to love her — and they did love her. But Stephanie, the youngest of four, had come unexpectedly and somewhat late in their lives, and on top of that, she was sickly and accident-prone, susceptible to mishaps.  She was […]

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  • 3 Strange & Wondrous Ways You Can Learn Poetry By Heart & Memorize Any Passage of Literature

    December 24th, 2019 | Poetry | journalpulp | 6 Comments

    Poems, unique among all literature, were for many centuries specifically meant to be learned by heart. They were meant to be memorized and then recited aloud. This is called the oral tradition of poetry — which in essence means holding literature in the mind and heart, and then reciting it. Thus we find in the oral tradition […]

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  • Oscar Wilde: Anniversary of His Death & the Wildest Misconceptions about Oscar

    November 19th, 2019 | Oscar Wilde | journalpulp | 2 Comments

    Oscar Wilde, the last of the great and hopelessly flamboyant, whose full name was Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde, is, perhaps because of his flamboyance and his fame — a fame which ended in scandal and tragedy — frequently misrepresented and misconceived. He died 119 years ago this month. I offer here three of the […]

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  • Petrarch, Shakespeare, and Sonnet 73

    November 15th, 2019 | Shakespeare | journalpulp | No Comments

    The Italian poet Petrarch (1304-1374) did not invent the Petrarchan sonnet. It was perhaps first used by Dante (1265-1321) and then later by many of Dante’s contemporaries and imitators. But Petrarch’s excellence with the form — especially when celebrating his beloved Laura — made the form much more widely known, so that even into the […]

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  • Two Poems

    Two Poems

    October 19th, 2019 | Uncategorized | journalpulp | 3 Comments

    I You came to me in a dream last night.Ghostly and dark, you were dressed in flowing white.Your hair hung long. Your eyes were light. You stood nearand spoke in a whisper that I could not hear.Together we walked through the desolate roomsof a strange house, where faint perfumesspiked the air. Outside, the wind blew […]

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  • Highway 66

    Highway 66

    October 12th, 2019 | Uncategorized | journalpulp | 3 Comments

    Thin blue highway hugging the soft edge of night, along this strange western town burningwith tangerine lightlike a necklace laid across a swellof grass, over some vast New Mexican plain,it fills me with a yearningI’ve never quite been able to quell,or explain.

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  • Neck Between Two Heads: a story of civilization and superstition

    Neck Between Two Heads: a story of civilization and superstition

    November 5th, 2018 | Fiction | journalpulp | 76 Comments

    CHAPTER 1 This happened shortly after his mother died, when he was seventeen-years-old, and the real violence had not yet begun. The day after her death, he dropped out of high school and went to live with his half brother, whom he’d only met once, eight years before. His half brother’s name was Jon. He […]

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  • Quiddity

    Quiddity

    September 6th, 2018 | Bartending | journalpulp | 3 Comments

    This certainly beats most of the other stuff I’ve had sent to me lately. Thank you TRD! And thank you Merrriam-Webster for using my sentence. “Quiddity” — Word of the Day, September 6th, 2018. That article, incidentally, which discusses the difference between mezcal and tequila, was part of a monthly series I once wrote for […]

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  • Beware the Ides of March

    March 15th, 2017 | Shakespeare | journalpulp | No Comments

    Ceasar: The ides of March are come. Soothsayer: Ay, Caesar, but not gone. — Julius Caesar, Act III, Scene 1. The word ides is derived from the ancient Roman calendar and comes from the Latin idus, which, as Oxford explains it, means “a day falling roughly in the middle of each month (the 15th day […]

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